Archive for July, 2018

30
Jul
18

WHEN I SING – THE INDIE FILM THAT COULD

I think I can. I think I can…tell my story.

FINISH FILM….check!

PRESS…check!  

WINS…check check check check check! 6 so far, including 2 Grand Jurys, and 2 Audience Awards!

wins november

Arizona Daily Star, April, 2018

New Jersey Stage, May, 2018

The Aquarian, June, 2018

Two River Times, June, 2018

Metrowest, Massachusetts, June 2018

Asbury Park Press, New Jersey – June, 2018

SCREENINGS in California, Texas, Arizona, New Jersey, New Mexico, Massachusetts, Nashville, Michigan, North Carolina, and Wisconsin.

 

sing-poster-blue-print

REVIEWS…check!

New Jersey Stage

WBZ-I-Heart Radio

RADIO INTERVIEWS…check!

Jackie’s Groove

WBZ-iheart radio with Morgan White

WHAT VIEWERS ARE SAYING

AWARDS…check!

ELFF – Audience Award  *Note. We won alongside Oscar Film, “The Insult.”

HRIFF – Best Feature Film

Houston Worldfest – Best Feature Film, Low Budget

Borderlands Film Festival

Best Screenplay

Best U.S. Feature

Grand Jury Award

 

SOLD OUT CROWDS…check!

SOLD OUT

ANY CHECKS IN THE MAIL?...

STAY TUNED FOR MORE SCREENINGS, AND FILM FESTIVALS –

And sign up to find out where and when @ whenising.com

For Speaking Engagements, please contact linda@whenising.com

Linda Chorney has been a TEDx Speaker, as well as an inspirational speaker for many events, and Universities.

 

 

 

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18
Jul
18

I second, Holy Shit, with When I Sing’s second review!

Well, it’s not the New York Times…yet. But it’s writers, publications, and movie lovers who are writing about When I Sing. And now for our second review, from New Jersey Stage magazine.

By Gary Wien

 

originally published: 07/18/2018

 

REVIEW: "When I Sing"

Most of the world learned of Linda Chorney in 2012 when her name was listed as one of the Grammy nominees for Best Americana Album. Her film, When I Sing, not only follows her rise from obscurity to the Grammy Awards, it goes much further.  It’s a love story between a die hard Red Sox fan and a Yankees fan; a spotlight on how indie artists survive on the road; and a deeply, revealing portrait of how the media and the music industry turned what could have been a wonderful Cinderella story into a very hurtful experience.

When I Sing was directed by Robin Russin and stars Chorney as herself, Maxwell Scott as her future husband Scott, Chris Mulkey as The Rock Doc; Bari Hyman as Linda’s mom; Mia Moravis as Rhonda/Rhoda, Eli Panero and Paul Chorney (Linda’s Dad) appear as themselves.  But the biggest star of the film is Linda’s music itself.  The songs in the film are wonderful and will lead many to wonder why Linda wasn’t a household name prior to the Grammy nomination.

The film begins with Linda performing at Apres Ski on a deck in Vail, Colorado.  It is here that she first meets Scott, a fan from the Jersey Shore who never knew Linda played shows literally in his backyard area.

The film shows how Linda took full advantage of a “companion pass” for an airline provided by a dear friend.  The pass allowed her to travel anywhere, which Linda used to help her perform all over the world.  Unfortunately, the pass only got her to places – she still needed to find a place to sleep after shows.    The hustle of an independent musician to find places to play, get paid, and get food and lodging (all while trying to keep costs to a minimum) is an interesting and important aspect of the film.

“What is it about a ballad that makes you want a frozen daiquiri?” she asks while performing and watching the bartender blend one up.  “But if it wasn’t for alcohol, musicians wouldn’t get paid, right?

Her path gradually attracts more and more “angels” along the way – people who would do anything to help her career.  One such angel helps her with the costs to produce her dream album – the recording that would be titled, Emotional Jukebox, and would change her life.

The album was so good people wanted her to submit it for Grammy consideration. This was an incredible long shot as no independent artist had ever been nominated before. Her odds changed when Linda learned about the Grammy 365 site, which allowed people to reach out and directly contact Grammy voters.  With the help of her teenage nephew, Eli Panero, she is able to invite hundreds of voters to listen to her album.  And many not only took her up on the invite, but loved the album and said they would vote for her.

When the nomination actually came, Linda thought people would love her story.  “I am officially starting my first documentary – my Cinderella story,” she said, holding up a video camera.  “Oh my God…. am I dreaming this?”

She runs through several opening segments, unsure of which road to go.  “Once upon a time there was an obnoxious Jewish girl who always wanted to be a rock star” was one take.  “Ladies and gentlemen, get ready to document the Americana story of the century of the self-absorbed artist’s ridiculous quest for validation!” was another.

“And what the hell is Americana?” she wondered.

Unfortunately, Americana was an established genre with a particular clique of its own and the establishment saw her as crashing a private party.  The film shows Linda having problems with publicists; Americana writers out to destroy her; and record label executives who bully her privately and publicly – accusing her of ‘gaming the system.’

In short, the film shows what happens when your dreams come true, but nothing changes… or things actually get worse.

Linda expects the nomination will help her career, but those expectations are crushed when she talks with a big time manager.  “Look, you have done great,” says the manager, skillfully played by Kiki Ebsen, says.  “What you have achieved on your own is amazing.  You sang in bars your whole life – why don’t you go back to singing in bars? It seems to be working for you.”

REVIEW: "When I Sing"

When I Sing balances that poignant lesson with a wonderful love story and lots of comedy.  The love story provides a nice balance to what could be a very sad story. The film is beautifully shot, moves at a nice pace, and offers interesting insight into the life of an independent artist.  A good part of the film was shot in New Jersey (where Linda lived for many years) and you’ll see plenty of logos for local businesses — The Windmill, Sea Bright Pizza, and 90.5 The Night are well represented. In fact, 90.5 DJ Jeff Raspe appears in the film as well. He is seen on stage at The Paramount Theatre in Asbury Park where Linda performed during a Light of Day Foundation concert.

Maxwell Scott is terrific as Scott, a huge fan of Linda’s music who wants to be romantically involved as well. Her nephew, Eli Panero, is often hilarious and, along with Linda’s father, adds even more realism to the story.  And Chris Mulkey provides a strong performance as the Rock Doc, but the film lives and dies with Linda’s performance, and she is good – very good.  Her performance reaches its highest heights in the closing moments after she finishes singing the title track.  Walking off stage, we see Linda begin to break down.  It’s a moment of pure pain, pure sadness, and pure honesty.  It speaks volumes.

When I Sing has been hitting the festival circuit and was rewarded with the People’s Choice Award for Best Feature Film at the Hollywood Reel Independent Film Festival; Best Feature Film – Low budget at World Fest Houston; and was a finalist for Picture of the Year in Nashville Universe film competition. The next stop for the film will be Borderlands Film Festival in New Mexico in October. Additional screenings are being added and can be found at whenising.com. Here’s hoping that the film finds its way on to television where the world will learn that there is much more to her story – there is a tremendous artist as well.

 

 

 

02
Jul
18

HOLY SHIT! FIRST REVIEW OF WHEN I SING! AND IT DOESN’T SUCK!

It’s about freaking time I got a review.  Yay!  We’ve screened “When I Sing” five times now.  Two screenings for Film Festivals – and we won both…and then three more, independently. Not only that, but our “little indie that could” has also received press.  Let’s do this!  

“When I Sing” Hits Many Sweet Chords 6-29-18

Review by
Jordan Rich
WBZ Boston, i-Heart Radio

 

For those who decry the lack of story, spirit or creativity found at

their local movie complexes these days, allow me to introduce

you to one Linda Chorney—-musician, writer, producer, and star

of her own inspiring cinematic story “When I Sing,” one of the

most endearing and entertaining indie films in years.

If you were to ponder, “Who the #@$%$ is Linda Chorney” you

would not be alone. It just happens to serve as one of the more

memorable taglines for the film. The question speaks to why

and how this “little movie that could” works as well as it does.

Audiences will find themselves (for a welcome change) cheering

for a real-life underdog, possessing tenacity and heart. And it’s a

sound bet that you will laugh, cry and empathize with the

characters along the way.

 

Linda Chorney has been a working musician for decades.

Gigging in clubs, opening for A-list artists, composing and

creating at a frenetic pace, she has managed to self-produce

several musically rich albums, albeit for limited audiences.

After many years of pursuing her dream of making it big (that

elusive dream shared by thousands of her fellow musicians) Linda

surprised the entertainment world in 2012 as the first truly

independent artist nominated for a Grammy award. While many

were excited for this talented artist who finally got some national

recognition, others in the industry attacked her for allegedly

“gaming” the system to acquire the nomination. The attacks

were often personal, demeaning and ugly. But through it all

Linda retained her unique brand of spunk and cutting sense of

humor. We witness her more delicate human side as well, as she

occasionally succumbs to the pressure, crying herself to sleep.

“When I Sing” is a film that musicians as well as plain

old civilians should find engaging.

 

The film spotlights certain friends and heroes she meets along her

way.  They include Jonathan, the “Rock Doc,” played by veteran

character actor Chris Mulkey. It’s Jonathan who encourages her

as a fan and offers a generous financial boost to produce what

would become the Grammy nominated album. Another key

character is Scott, played with warmth and likability by

actor Maxwell Scott. Scott becomes the friend and lover whose

adoration and support for Linda is unwavering and real. Her

journey is made easier and much more fun thanks to Linda’s

steadfast soul mate Scott.

 

A couple of actual family member of Linda’s, as well as genuine

music industry people in her story, appear in “When I Sing.”

There’s her teenage nephew “Eli” who aids Linda in navigating

social media during the run up to the Grammys. Eli Panero is a

scene stealer (which tends to run in the Chorney family). Linda’s

real life Dad, Paul, plays himself and adds a loving, humorous

touch alongside vivacious actress Bari Hyman portraying her

Mom. “When I Sing” is lovingly dedicated to Linda’s Mom,

Shirley.

 

The most important bit of casting however is that of Linda, the

central character. She’s energetic, exuberant, fragile and quirky.

We’re rooting for her from the opening scene, witnessing the

emotional rollercoaster this talented, complex, lovable musician

Encounters.

 

When asked about playing herself, the star of one of the most

original, heartfelt, hilarious indie films in years told a preview

audience that she tried hard to woo Sandra Bullock to play her in

the film. I was in attendance conducting the Q&A  that evening

and the consensus was that while we all agree that Sandra

Bullock is a superb Oscar-winning actress, no one could have

played the role of our fearless heroine with more conviction and

heart than Linda Chorney herself. She turns out to be one heck

of an actor.

 

Don’t see this movie expecting even the briefest of car chases

(although there are some hysterical moments involving Linda in

cars). Thankfully, there are no explosions or gunshots and

certainly no superheroes in tights to be found. What you can

expect is a movie about a real woman, reaching for her brass

ring, and dealing with identifiable setbacks and triumphs along

with a handful of well placed “F” bombs along the way.

The film concludes with Linda’s touching performance of the title

song “When I Sing,” an anthem for anyone who’s been bullied,

beaten down or neglected. Her lyrics address the hope that lies

at the core of the movie…

 

“There’s just one thing makes me feel as light as a child on a

swing, where no one can hurt me…when I sing.”

This “little movie that could” is well worth seeing and supporting.

For more visit http://www.whenising.com.

 

Maynard MA JR

SOLD OUT

Clap, clap, clap!  And now for the press so far!

ARIZONA DAILY STAR  

NEW JERSEY STAGE

TWO RIVER TIMES

THE AQUARIAN

METROWEST DAILY NEWS

WICKED LOCAL

And here’s what other folks have been saying as they leave the theatre on WHEN I SING WICKED AWESOME WORLD TOUR. Please request a screening in your town. And I’ll sing a few songs for you, too. (Enough Linda til ya puke!) Just go to whenising.com and sign up for tour dates, and say hello!




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